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Wood Buffalo AB
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A fisheries and water quality survey of ten lakes in the Richardson Tower area northeastern Alberta. Volume I: Methodology summary and discussion


Author(s): Ash, G. R., & Noton L. R.

Year: 1980

Abstract:
A fisheries and water quality survey was conducted in September 1979 on 10 small lakes (67.4 to 338.9 ha) in the vicinity of Richardson Tower, approximately 140 km north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. The major objectives were: (1) to determine morphometric and water quality characteristics in relation to habitat requirements for indigenous and possible introduced species of fish; (2) to assess potential fish yield; and (3) to determine the susceptibility of the lakes to acidification. Maximum lake depth ranged from 6 to 16 m; mean depth varied from 1.9 to 8.0 m. Morphoedaphic indices varied from 16.7 to 54.3. Water quality was fairly uniform with moderate concentrations of dissolved sol ids total filterable residue slightly above 100 mg/L), calcium and bicarbonate at the major ions, and low phosphorus levels. Waters were clear, largely unstained, and generally well oxygenated. Water quality in most lakes was highly suitable for fish production. Ten species of fish were recorded. All lakes supported northern pike while only five contained walleye. Lake whitefish was present in all but one lake. Yellow perch, although recorded in seven of the lakes, were slow growing and small in size. Estimates of potential fish yield varied from 4.8 to 6.5 kg/ha/yr to 8.2 to 10.9 kg/ha/yr. Mean total alkalinity of the study lakes was 77 mg/L (1.53 meq/L). Although terrestrial buffering responses were uncertain, it appeared that lakes are not highly susceptible to acidification (i.e., at precipitation acidities foreseeable for the study area).

A fisheries and water quality survey of ten lakes in the Richardson Tower area Northeastern Alberta. Volume II: Data


Author(s): Ash, G. R., & Noton L. R.

Year: 1980

Abstract:
A fisheries and water quality survey was conducted in September 1979 on 10 small lakes (67.4 to 338.9 hal in the vicinity of Richardson Tower, approximately 140 km north of Fort McMurray, Alberta). The major objectives were: (1) to determine morphometric and water quality characteristics in relation to habitat requirements for indigenous and possible introduced species of fish; (2) to assess potential fish yield; and (3) to determine the susceptibility of the lakes to acidification. This information is contained in Volume I. Volume I I contains all data collected for this study.

A study of water and sediment quality as related to public health issues, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta


Author(s): Timoney, K. P.

Year: 2007

Abstract:
"This study examined water and sediment quality indicators in the area of Fort Chipewyan, Alberta. Data were analyzed and discussed in the contexts of water and sediment quality guidelines, wildlife contaminants, and ecosystem and public health.

As long as the rivers flow: Athabasca River knowledge, use and change


Author(s): Candler, C., Olson R., & Deroy S.

Year: 2010

Abstract:
"The Study confirms that, for members of both ACFN and MCFN, the Athabasca River continues to be central to their lives, their ability to access their territories, and their conception of themselves as aboriginal peoples, despite historical change. Use of the river by the participants is still strong and diverse, and while use has generally declined, it has declined in some areas more than others. Use for drinking water, trapping and teaching have declined more than use for hunting, transportation, and cultural/spiritual and wellness practices. The Study suggests that reduced quantity and quality of water in the Athabasca is having adverse effects on the ability of ACFN and MCFN members to access territories, and to practice their aboriginal and Treaty rights, including hunting, trapping, fishing and related activities.

Background air and precipitation chemistry


Year: 1978

Abstract:
In March 1976, the first in a series of intensive field studies was carried out in the Alberta Oil Sands Environmental Research Program study area in northeastern Alberta to examine the fine structure of the atmosphere and dispersion characteristics under winter conditions. The study comprised several co-ordinated sets of measurements over a two week period. These included: minisonde flights, tethersonde vertical profiles, acoustic sounder and delta-T sonde profiles, correlation spectrometer and ground level sulphur dioxide measurements, plume rise photography and background air and precipitation chemistry. Plume dispersion measurements made by aircraft were co-ordinated with the study and are reported in a separate publication. All measurements, except those for background air chemistry, were made within 20 km of Mildred Lake taking in the present oil sands processing facility of Great Canadian Oil Sands Ltd. and the future production site of Syncrude Canada Ltd. The study was successful in identifying unique features of the winter environment of the area such as diurnal formation and breakup of inversion layers, the effects of the river valley on circulation patterns, plume characteristics, pollutant deposition patterns in the snowpack and background levels of gases and particulates.

Emporium of the north: Fort Chipewyan and the fur trade to 1835


Author(s): Parker, J. M. P.

Year: 1987

Abstract:
This study examines the establishment of the fur trade at Lake Athabasca, with Fort Chipewyan as its focus. It covers the period from the entry of Peter Pond in 1778, to 1835. By then, the fur trade had recovered from the damaging effects of the competition between the North West Company and the Hudson's Bay Company that preceded their amalgamation in 1821. The study portrays the life of a fort as it was related to the fur trade of a district. Fort Chipewyan, headquarters of both the North West Company's and Hudson's Bay Company's Athabasca enterprises, offers an opportunity to examine the fur trade under the differing conditions prior to and after 1821. Although documents are lacking for the North West period, there are sufficient records to indicate the conditions of the trade. Fort Chipewyan, the first European settlement in Alberta, was ideally situated for the fur trade, located as it is at the hub of a drainage system. The fort was reached from the south by the Athabasca River and the streams running to the north and to the west became highways for expansion of the trade. Lake Athabasca stretches to the east. As a base for extending the trade, Fort Chipewyan ranked second, surpassed only by Fort William on Lake Superior. It was not only the fur trade that benefited from the establishment of Fort Chipewyan, however, because as the "Grand Magazine of the North" it became the base of operations for land explorers. Alexander Mackenzie, John Franklin, George Back, and John Richardson were a few of the men who gained fame after passing through its gates.

Interim report of soil research related to revegetation of the oil sands area


Year: 1980

Abstract:
Monitoring was continued at instrumented sites which were selected in spring 1976, at Mildred Lake, Supertest Hill, the GCOS dike, and near Richardson Tower. Because of budget limitations, sites at Richardson were only monitored occasionally. However, information was obtained at a number of temporary 'outlying sites', which showed that conditions at the instrumented sites are fairly representative of those under similar vegetation in the surrounding area. Special emphasis in 1977, was placed on obtaining detailed information on moisture tensions using thermocouple psychrometers, and in acquiring accurate information on changes in moisture distribution during spring thaw. Growth of grasses and legumes in tailings sand, and the effect of adding materials such as peat and glacial till to tailings sand, were studied using lysimeters both indoors and in the field, and by establishing small plots, all of which were instrumented for gathering of physical and chemical information. Aspects of nutrient cycling such as nutrient inputs and outputs at forest sites, nitrogen mineralization and immobilization, retention of nitrogen by soil mixes, and decomposition of plant materials, were investigated with 15N and 14C. Laboratory studies were carried out on nitrogen and carbon cycling in tailings sand and two overburden materials. Much interpretation of information gathered over the year is still to be done and will be included in the next report.

Long term prediction of vegetation performance on mined sands


Author(s): Bliss, L. C.

Year: 1977

Abstract:
This project on the \"Long Term Prediction of Vegetation Performance On Mined Sands\" (V.E.6.1) was undertaken to provide management with answers on the predictive ability to maintain different kinds of vegetation on raw sands. The research was designed as an integrated, multi-disciplinary program that would concentrate on the role of water stress in a dynamic soil-plant-atmosphere system of a planted grass cover and a natural Jack pine forest. To date only the latter project has been initiated because of the lack of funding and approval to work on the GCOS dike in 1975. This and the Syncrude dyke represent the worst (driest) environmental situation and therefore revegetation of other sand deposits should be more easily accomplished. The Richardson Fire Tower site was chosen because of the representativeness of its Jack pine - lichen woodland on deep sands, a forest type so characteristic of northeastern Alberta. The results of the first full year show that climatically this southwest-facing sand slope warms more rapidly in spring than do level sites at Mildred Lake and Fort McMurray and that the 1976 summer was above normal for temperature. Precipitation was near normal based upon the 1941 - 1970 period. Of the >60 days of precipitation, over 60% were 4 mm or less and thus little if any water entered the soil due to tree, lichen, and litter interception. Both needle duff and lichens provide a significant barrier to surface evaporation compared with open sand. Resistance to evaporation is 2 to 3 times greater with a lichen cover than with litter. The soils are very porous which is advantageous for water entrance, thus preventing erosion but porosity is a disadvantage in maintaining higher water levels near the soil surface for plant growth. These soils recharge during snowmelt in late March - early April; little runoff occurs and over the summer soil water drawdown takes place. Soil moisture content (volume basis) is generally 8 - 15% near the surface in spring, but by late September is 1 - 3% at all depths. Xylem water potentials, a measure of tree water content, were never very low (mean maximum at dawn -5 to -7 atm. and mean minimum at midday -11 to -14 atm.) which reflect a year of average precipitation with frequent light rains and periodic heavier storms. Transpiration and stomatal closure were controlled largely by vapour pressure deficits. Jack pine avoided spring drought by remaining dormant when air and needle temperatures were above freezing, yet when soils were still frozen. Although Jack pine did not show indications of severe drought in a relatively moist summer, it did develop xylem water potentials of -16 to -18 atm., values which are probably detrimental to many of the species being used in revegetation trials on the dike (Bromus inermis, Phleum pratense, and species of Agropyron). This means that potential species must be drought hardy and tested under laboratory rather than only under field conditions to determine their survival under severe drought conditions that may occur but once in 30 to 50 years. The studies of mycorrhizae show that a large number of species of fungi infect the roots of Jack pine and that the infecting flora from disturbed soils (old burns) is quite different from that of undisturbed forests. Since mycorrhizae are critical for the proper growth and survival of pines, care in innoculating tree seedlings with the proper species is essential. The energy and water balance mathematical model predicts the heat and water status of the Jack pine forest. Examination of the model outputs suggests that late season resistance to water uptake occurs because of increased root resistance in autumn. If this is confirmed with further experimental data, and model runs, it means that fall droughts may be especially critical because of the reduced ability of the trees to absorb water through their roots. A second field season coupled with the laboratory studies to determine lethal and sublethal levels of water stress in Jack pine will provide the added inputs to the models necessary for predicting tree response to severe climatic stress. These data, gathered in a highly integrated manner, will permit the calculation of tree survival on sands, be they dikes or other kinds of mined sand, in terms of soil water content and tree density (including crown extent) in relation to the exceptional dry year that may occur once in 30 to 50 years. Data from field trials of grasses or woody species, without supporting measurements of plant physiological responses to environmental conditions cannot provide this essential predictive tool for management unless the one in 30 to 50 year drought cycle is encountered. It is for this reason that modelling of the data in order to predict plant response to unusual environmental conditions becomes so useful. In summary, this study should be able to provide sufficient data to determine whether or not an open stand of Jack pine or similar conifer is the desired end point in maintaining vegetation at a low maintenance cost on sands, the result of open pit mining of the oil sands.

Oilsands' use of Athabasca River violating treaty rights: report.


Author(s): Sands, A.

Year: 2010

Abstract:
Low water levels and contamination in the Athabasca River are cutting Alberta First Nations off from traditional hunting, fishing and trapping lands and taking away treaty rights, says a report released Thursday.

Segmentation analysis and bathymetric surveys of the Athabasca River - Segment 1


Year: 2008

Abstract:
This report provides a review available literature and data sources to determine segment boundaries within the Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD) for the Athabasca River Delta channels. To support the segmentation analysis, and to determine the overwintering habitat potential within the major Delta channels, mapping grade bathymetric data were collected for several critical sites identified by the Instream Flow Needs Technical Task Group including: the Embarras River; Embarras River breakthrough channel to Mamawi Creek ( may also be known as Cree Creek); Mamawi Creek; Jackfish Creek (conveys Athabasca River water into Richardson Lake during flow reversals); Richardson River (conveys Athabasca River water during flow reversals); Fletcher Channel; Goose Island Channel; Big Point Channel; and, the area known as Big Eddy. The report contains a description of the field survey as well as its results.

Soils of permanent sample plots in the Athabasca oil sands area


Author(s): Turchenek, L. W.

Year: 1982

Abstract:
Soils of permanent sample plots were investigated to provide baseline data for research related to monitoring of terrestrial ecosystems. More specifically, the objective of this project was to provide information on the kinds, characteristics, and distribution of soils in 16 permanent sample plots, each of about 5 ha area, established during 1981. The background and general purpose of the project are outlined in the Terms of Reference appended to this report. General information about distribution and characteristics of soils in the oil sands area is provided in a report on the soils inventory of the Alberta Oil Sands Environmental Research Program study area (Turchenek and Lindsay 1982). Emphasis in 1981 was placed on selecting permanent sample plots with jack pine vegetation communities on Eluviated Dystric Brunisols. These soils are members of the Mildred and Heart soil groups which are described in the report of Turchenek and Lindsay (1982). Both of these soils groups are composed predominantly of Eluviated Dystric Brunisols. The Heart soils have developed in eolian sands while Mildred soils have formed in sandy glaciofluvial materials. Both soil groups are very sandy and usually contain less than 5% fine materials (clays and silt). The Mildred soils normally have a variable content of coarse fragments (larger than 2 mm) while Heart soils have no coarse materials. Two permanent sample plots were established in the Richardson Hills Upland. Soils in this area belong to the Firebag soil group; they have developed on sandy, gravelly and stony glaciofluvial ice-contact deposits, but are otherwise similar to the Mildred and Heart soil groups. In this project, samples for laboratory analysis were taken from one or two sites within each permanent sample plot. For additional data and for making comparisons, analytical data for Heart, Mildred, and Firebag soils can be found in Volume 2 of the report by Turchenek and Lindsay (1982). Other soil surveys conducted in the general area are those of Hardy Associates Ltd. (1980) for the Alsands lease, and Twardy (1978) for portions of the Syncrude lease. Information about general properties, moisture movement and retention, and nutrient cycling in soils near the AOSERP Mildred Lake research facility can be found in the report of McGill et al. (1980).

Spider records from four wildland parks in northeastern Alberta


Author(s): Nordstrom, W., & Buckle D.

Year: 2002

Abstract:
Several wildland parks and two ecological reserves have recently been established in the northeast corner of Alberta (Figure 1). Colin-Cornwall Lakes Fidler-Greywillow, La Butte Creek and Maybelle River Wildland Parks are located in the Canadian Shield Natural Region. Egg Island and Athabasca Dunes Ecological Reserves are also located in that Natural Region. Birch Mountains, Marguerite River and Richardson River Dunes Wildland Parks are within the Boreal Forest Natural Region (Alberta Environmental Protection 1998). These wildland parks contain numerous and important examples of Alberta's biodiversity. Much of it is poorly understood or unknown, particularly the invertebrate fauna. The spider fauna is no exception. As Aitchison and Sutherland (2000) state, "…information on the composition and functioning of the boreal forest arachnid community [in Canada] remains sketchy". The spider specimens that were collected during this survey are the first for these wildland parks of northeastern Alberta.

Supplemental fisheries life history data for selected lakes and streams in the AOSERP study area


Author(s): Herbert, B. K.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
During 1977, various rivers and Jakes from the MacKay, Richardson, and Maybelle river drainages, the Ells River headwaters, and the east slope of the Birch Mountains were spot sampled for fish. Life history information and location data for the 672 fish, of 17 species, collected from these areas are presented in table format. The 17 species collected during this. survey are as follows: Arctic Grayling, Lake Whitefish, Lake Cisco, Lake Trout, Northern Pike, Longnose Dace, Lake Chub, Pearl Dace, Longnose Sucker, White Sucker, Burbot, Trout-Perch, Brook Stickleback, Ninespine Stickleback, Yellow Perch, Walleye, and Slimy Sculpin.

Survey of Odonata in the Canadian Shield Natural region of northeastern Alberta. II. 2001 survey of La Butte Creek and Fidler-Greywillow Wildlands Parks


Author(s): Macaulay, D.

Year: 2002

Abstract:
In Alberta, the Canadian Shield Ecoregion is restricted to the extreme northeast part of the province (Strong and Leggat 1992). It is subdivided into the Kazan Upland Subregion and the Athabasca Plain Subregion, located to the north and south of Lake Athabasca, respectively. There are several wildland parks that have recently been established in these two subregions. An odonate survey was conducted in the summer of 2000 (Hornung) within three of the wildland parks that are located in the Athabasca Plain Subregion, namely Maybelle River, Marguerite River and Richardson River Dunes. This survey was the first for these three parks. Two parks located in the Kazan Upland Subregion were the focus for an odonate survey in the summer of 2001, namely La Butte Creek and Fildler-Greywillow Wildland Parks. The subregion within which these two wildland parks are located contains extensive riparian and shield outcrop habitats. The purpose of the survey in La Butte Creek and Fildler-Greywillow was to provide an annotated summary of the odonate species that occur in these parks, including notes on such parameters as relative abundance, distribution patterns, range extensions and any other relevant biological or behavioral information. The information obtained would contribute towards an increased understanding of the odonate fauna both within the two wildland parks but also within the broader context of Alberta.

Survey of the butterflies and moths (Lepidoptera) of the Canadian Shield Natural Region of Alberta


Author(s): Schmidt, B. C., & Pohl G. R.

Year: 2000

Abstract:
The Canadian Shield ecoregion is one of six natural regions found in Alberta. It is restricted to the extreme northeastern part of the province (Strong & Leggat 1992). This region is further divided into the Kazan Upland and Athabasca Plain that are located north and south of Lake Athabasca, respectively. Although the Lepidoptera are one of the dominant insect groups of the Boreal Plain (Danks 1979), very few accounts of local butterfly inventories are available (Bird et al. 1995), and no published inventories of moths exist for any given site in Alberta. The recently established parks within the Athabasca Plain subregion, consisting of the Richardson River Dunes Wildland Park, Marguerite Crag & Tail Wildland Park, Maybelle River Wildland Park and Athabasca Dunes Ecological Reserve, encompass a unique sand dune complex. Typical boreal habitats are also represented. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the Lepidoptera species found to date within the new parks and adjacent areas, with a brief synopsis of species' distribution patterns and conservation status.

The fish and fisheries of the Athabasca River basin: Status and environmental requirements


Year: 1984

Abstract:
The information presented here reviews what is currently known of fish ecology and production of the Athabasca Basin, and includes discussions of fish production, sport and commercial use of fish populations, and alternative opportunities for recreational fishing in the rivers of the Athabasca Basin. Fisheries management objectives for the basin rivers and data gaps in existing knowledge of fish and fisheries are also discussed. In addition, water quality criteria for the protection of fish and aquatic life have been referenced, and, where possible, stream flows which affect fish populations have been included. The Athabasca Basin accounts for 23% of the land area of Alberta. For the purposes of this report, the basin has been divided into 10 sub-basins: four mainstem sub-basins, and six tributary sub-basins. The mainstems of the principal rivers of the 10 sub-basins provide approximately 4,390 km of fish habitat which can be roughly divided as providing 1,500 km (34%) coldwater habitat (supporting mainly trout and whitefish), 2,250 km (51%) warmwater habitat (supporting mainly pike, walleye, and goldeye), and 640 km (15%) transition zone intermediate between the two. Both commercial and recreational fisheries occur within the Athabasca Basin. The commercial fish catch represents a substantial proportion of the overall harvest and total market value of the Alberta commercial fishery. The recreational fishery occurs mainly in rivers and streams, though some lakes and reservoirs provide alternate opportunities. In 1980/81, approximately 9% (26,346) of Alberta's licensed anglers resided and fished within the Athabasca Basin. The opportunities provided to sport fishermen by the basin rivers have local, regional and in some cases, national significance. The Athabasca River rises high in the Rocky Mountains, and terminates at the delta created by the Peace and Athabasca rivers at the western extreme of Lake Athabasca. Over its length, the Athabasca River grows from a torrential high-mountain stream to a silt-laden major river at its delta, and its basin encompasses virtually every temperate stream type. In its upstream reaches, the Athabasca River flows generally northeast, steadily increasing in volume as it receives flows from the Berland, McLeod, Pembina, Lesser Slave, Lac La Biche, and Calling rivers. Further downstream, in the vicinity of a series of rapids, the river receives flows from the Pelican and Horse rivers. Near Fort McMurray, the Athabasca forms a confluence with the Clearwater River, and turns to flow north through the Athabasca Oi1 Sands region. Within the oil sands, the Athabasca River receives flows from many rivers and streams, including the Steepbank, Muskeg, Mackay, Ells, Firebag, and Richardson rivers. Reaching the Peace-Athabasca Delta near Embarras Portage, the Athabasca River subsequently forms part of the Mackenzie drainage, which empties into the Beaufort Sea. Flowing through diverse and widely differing terrain, including remote alpine areas, populated urban settings, and the 1argest open-pit oil sands mining sites in the world, the Athabasca Basin is made up of a corresponding variety of waterbodies. Within the basin, each sub-basin has characteristic fish-producing capabilities, which are largely determined by the conditions which contribute to its environment. The primary features of each sub-basin and the characteristics of its lakes and rivers are summarized.

Walleye and goldeye fisheries investigations in the Peace-Athabasca Delta - 1975


Year: 1976

Abstract:
The following report presents the results of- investigations on walleye and goldeye in the Peace-Athabasca Delta in 1975. The report is divided into four main sections that concern the following topics: (1) walleye in the Richardson Lake – Lake Athabasca system; (2) goldeye in the Lake Claire – Mamawi Lake system; (3) field observations of the completed Little Rapids weir on Riviere des Rochers; (4) assessment of field trials of the feasibility of marking fish with acrylic dye. Spawning success, movement, distribution, age structure, and several other biological characteristics of walleye and goldeye in the Peace-Athabasca Delta are discussed. The results of fisheries investigations in 1975 were generally incomplete because of the late initiation (mid-July) of the field work, and must therefore be interpreted carefully. BACKGROUND AND PERSPECTIVE The study on walleye and goldeye in the Peace-Athabasca Delta was sponsored by the Aquatic Fauna Technical Research Committee of AOSERP, in cooperation with the Peace Athabasca Delta Monitoring Group. This group is a multidisciplinary committee composed of representatives from governments of Alberta. Saskatchewan and Canada, and charged with the responsibility of monitoring the effects of remedial measures taken to restore water levels in the delta region. AOSERP funded the investigation in order to gain insight into baseline conditions with respect to walleye and goldeye in the Peace-Athabasca Delta. Walleye Investigations The primary objectives of this study were to delimit fry production in Richardson Lake during 1975 and to obtain the current age structure of the Lake Athabasca walleye population. A secondary objective was to obtain length-weight, age-length relationships and to determine sex ratios for the Lake Athabasca walleye. Studies on walleye fry numbers in the Delta region, surveys of some Saskatchewan streams along the south shore of Lake Athabasca and studies on life history and population dynamics of walleye in the delta have provided evidence that Richardson Lake is a major spawning ground for walleye arid that spawning in Richardson Lake provides most of the annual recruitment to the Lake Athabasca walleye population. Although all areas in the delta have not been surveyed, no other region in the delta has been identified as a major walleye spawning area. Much of Richardson Lake, and its outlet stream, Jackfish Creek, freeze to the bottom during winter. Walleye migrate from Lake Athabasca to the Athabasca River by Big Point Channel during March. Due to ice thickness and the lack of flowing water, walleye cannot enter Richardson Lake until flood waters from the Athabasca River flow into Richardson Lake via Jackfish Creek. These flood waters normally lift the ice in late April, or soon thereafter, and the spawning migration proceeds into Richardson Lake. It is possible that unusually low waters in the spring could cause conditions which would prevent or delay walleye from spawning in Richardson Lake. In view of the present situation, it appears that Richardson Lake is critical to the recruitment of walleye in Lake Athabasca and that the spawning success of this species could be seriously disrupted by unusually low water, during the spring. Goldeye Investigations The major objectives of this study were to determine the age structure of the goldeye population in the Claire-Mamawi Lakes system; and to estimate spawning success of goldeye in the system. A secondary objective was to collect information concerning seasonal movements of goldeye. Results from past studies indicate that goldeye migrate into waters of the Peace-Athabasca Delta in the spring to spawn and move back into the Peace River during summer and autumn. These studies suggest that the Chenal des Quatre Fourches is a major spring migration route for adult and juvenile goldeye as well as a major summer and autumn migration route for goldeye adults, juveniles and fry. Concern has arisen that water level control structures may block) this migration route. It was not possible to absolutely assess the spawning success of goldeye in 1975 because the number of spawners was unknown. In relative terms spawning in 1975 appeared to be less successful than in previous years. Little Rapids Weir On the basis of data gathered during ground and aerial inspections, several sites close to and on both sides of the weir and fishway have been identified as being suitable for setting gillnets. Nets cannot be set close to the weir or fishway due to strong turbulence. The dam constructed across the Flett bypass channel of Riviere des Rochers was also inspected. Water in this channel can flow through the rockfill dam, but fish cannot pass through this structure. Acrylic Dye Marking of Fish A total of 38 walleye were marked during September 1975, in Lake Athabasca near Fort Chipewyan. Most walleye were injected in the operculum (gill cover) and several were injected in the lower jaw. Injection was accomplished more easily in the operculum than in the lower jaw but because pigmentation in the lower jaw is lighter, the dye was more visible. During October 1975, 47 goldeye were marked above the weir at Little Rapids. They were injected at the origin of the anal fin. Between 30 and 40 northern pike and lake whitefish respectively were also marked. The most suitable injection site of a northern pike was at the base of either pelvic fin. Blue dye was easily visible anywhere on the ventral surface of lake whitefish, but was most visible at the base of the adipose fin. ASSESSMENT In depth investigations of spawning success, movement, distribution, age structure and other biological characteristics of walleye and goldeye populations in Peace-Athabasca Delta were conducted for the Aquatic Fauna Technical Research Committee of AOSERP. The study provides baseline information on walleye and goldeye populations with respect to the “before conditions” faced by the Athabasca Delta fisheries in view of the prospect of present and increased levels of oil sands development. This “before condition” is in the context of the “after condition” produced by remedial measures implemented after the Peace-Athabasca Delta Project Investigations into the effects of the Bennett Dam constructed on the Peace River in 1968. The report has been reviewed extensively by Research Secretariat of Alberta Environment and the Aquatic Fauna Research Committee and has been approved for publication. The content of this report does not necessarily reflect the views of Alberta Environment, Environment Canada or the Oil Sands Environmental Study Group. The mention of trade names for commercial products does not constitute an endorsement or recommendation for use. The Aquatic Fauna Committee acknowledges the importance of this report with respect to future fisheries studies in the Peace-Athabasca Delta. It will serve as the basis for studies into the effects of other manmade, structures in, the Athabasca River basin. Such basic investigations: are important since the Peace-Athabasca Delta is one of the most productive regions in Alberta. It is recognized by the Oil Sands Environmental Study Group that although innovative research methodology was not employed in the study, changes in methodology are difficult to accommodate during or after completion of a field project. The OSESG does acknowledge that the research objectives have been met and compliments the researchers on addressing themselves directly to the research subjects. The Aquatic Fauna Technical Research Committee of the Alberta Oil Sands Environmental Research Program accepts \"Walleye and Goldeye Investigations in the Peace-Athabasca Delta - 1975\" as an important and valid research document, and thanks the researchers for their scientific contributions.