Skip To Content

Fish Lake


View Larger Map

Location

Woodlands County AB
Canada

1974 goat season


Author(s): Hall, B.

Year: 1974

Citation:
Hall, B. (1974).  1974 goat season. Unpublished report AFW-74-119,

A bibliography of the Athabasca oil sands Fort McMurray Alberta area: Socio-economic and environmental studies. 1980 cumulated update


Author(s): Sanford, C.

Year: 1980

Abstract:
This is the fifth cumulated update of' a bibliography originally prepared in early 1974 at the request of Dr. S. B. Smith, who was at that time Chairman of the Research Secretariat, Alberta Department of the Environment, and who is presently Director of the Alberta Oil Sands Environmental Research Program. The objective of the bibliography is to provide a comprehensive listing of reports relating to the socio-economic and environmental aspects of the development of the Athabasca oil Sands. Major reports and some articles on the other oil sands areas of Alberta - Cold Lake, Peace River and Wabasca - are also included. This edition, which includes journal articles received up to the end of September 1979 and reports received prior to November 1979 by the Alberta Environment Library, contains references to about 1,900 items. In addition to listing materials published since the previous edition, it also includes references to earlier items on the history of the development of the Alberta Oil Sands and on the environmental and socio-economic implications of this development. These were located by using the Alberta oil Sands Index and Oil Shales and Tar Sands: A Bibliography. These bibliographies are cited in section I. Several modifications have been made to the organization of the bibliography. Items in the \"General Background References\" section are now arranged chronologically. The \"Economic Aspects\" and \"Industry and Resources Development\" sections under \"Socio-Economic Studies, Fort McMurray Area\" have been merged. The \"Manpower and Employment\" section formerly under the \"New Town of Fort McMurray\" has become a sub-heading of the \"Fort McMurray Area\" section. The \"Ecology/Environment\" section has been moved to become the first section of the \"Environmental Studies\" section. Separate sections have been established for items pertaining to the Cold Lake, Peace River and Wabasca Oil Sands. The Cold Lake and Peace River sections have also been further subdivided to bring articles on the same topic together. Please note that the “Geology” section contains only very selective references. Also, the \"Historical Background Material” section includes a selective listing of early Geological Survey of Canada reports and other early studies. These items give a general description of the area including topography and climate, as well as the hydrological and geographical features. References are only cited once, e.g. if an item deals with both air and water pollution, it could be located in either “Air Pollution General” or “Water Quality and Pollution” , depending on which subject area has received the greatest emphasis. Title entries have not been made for items listed in the \"Application by Industry to the Government of Alberta\" sections. An asterisk beside a title in the title index indicates that the report is held by the Alberta Environment Library. Because journals are readily available, it was felt unnecessary to extend this marking to include journal articles.

A bibliography of the Athabasca oil sands Fort McMurray Alberta area: Socio-economic and environmental studies. 1982 supplement


Author(s): Bramm, S.

Year: 1982

Abstract:
This 1982 supplement to the 1980 cumulated update of \"A Bibliography of the Athabasca oil Sands, Fort McMurray, Alberta Area: Socio-Economic and Environmental Studies\" contains references to about 900 items. It lists journal articles received up to the end of November 1981 and reports received prior to February 1982 by the Alberta Environment Library. In addition to performing a computer search of selected data bases, the following sources were checked for pertinent references: the Alberta Oil Sands Index; the Alberta Municipal Affairs Library; the Alberta Tourism and Small Business Library; Alberta Culture, Historical Resources Division collection; the Library of the Northeast Alberta Regional Commissioner's Office; and the public reports published by Syncrude Canada Ltd. The assistance provided by staff of these libraries was greatly appreciated. With the exception of the changes noted below, entries are arranged under the headings used in the 1980 cumulated update. All headings and numbers appear in the table of contents; those for which there are no relevant entries in this supplement are marked \"No additions this supplement\" These headings and notes are not repeated in the body of the work. The heading for section A under \"VIII. Socio-Economic Studies\" has been changed from \"Fort McMurray Area\" to \"Athabasca Oil Sands Area\" to more accurately indicate the geographic area covered by items listed in this section. Section A also includes a new section \"Education\". As Fort McMurray is now a city, the heading for section VII. B has been changed to \"Fort McMurray\" from \"New Town of Fort McMurray\". Section VII. C \"New Townsite (for Alsands Project)\" has been established to allow for the subdivision of materials on the proposed new townsite. The 1980 cumulated update provided for separate sections for the Cold Lake, Peace River and Wabasca Oil Sands. The subdivisions \"Socio-Economic Studies\" and \"Environmental Studies\" used under Cold Lake are further subdivided using headings comparable to those established for studies on the Athabasca oil Sands. The Peace River and Wabasca sections both contain the following subdivisions: \"General Background References\", \"Historical Background Material and Archaeology\", \"Socio-Economic Studies\", and \"Environmental Studies\". A few items listed in the 1980 cumulated update have been repeated in this supplement in order to either correct the entry printed previously or to include additional information.

A biochemical genetic study of zoogeography of lake whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis, in western Canada in relation to their possible survival in a Nahanni glacial refugium


Author(s): Foote, C. J.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
Lake whitefish, Coregonus clupeaformis, populations from across western Canada were studied in reference to their isolation and subsequent dispersal from separate glacial refugia. Frequencies of alleles of the genes governing electrophoretic phenotypes of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-3-PDH), heart-type lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) proved useful for characterizing populations. Hemoglobin electrophoretic phenotypes and modal gillraker numbers for each population were useful in discerning differences among large groups of populations. Three biochemically distinct population groups of lake whitefish were found in western Canada and it is suggested that the most plausible hypothesis to account for the genetic integrity and geographical distribution of these groups is that they have separate origins in glacial refugia. Selection did not appear to account for the present genetic distinctions between the groups. It has been shown previously that lake whitefish probably survived the Wisconsin glaciation in both the Bering and Mississippi-Missouri glacial refugia. Recent geological evidence and the results of the present study regarding the distribution of populations of one of the groups favour isolation and dispersal from an additional refugium in the area of the present Nahanni National Park, N.W.T... Contact of the different refugial forms appears to have led to introgression in some cases but, in general, most populations remain genetically distinct even in the absence of physical barriers to gene flow.

A fisheries and water quality survey of ten lakes in the Richardson Tower area northeastern Alberta. Volume I: Methodology summary and discussion


Author(s): Ash, G. R., & Noton L. R.

Year: 1980

Abstract:
A fisheries and water quality survey was conducted in September 1979 on 10 small lakes (67.4 to 338.9 ha) in the vicinity of Richardson Tower, approximately 140 km north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. The major objectives were: (1) to determine morphometric and water quality characteristics in relation to habitat requirements for indigenous and possible introduced species of fish; (2) to assess potential fish yield; and (3) to determine the susceptibility of the lakes to acidification. Maximum lake depth ranged from 6 to 16 m; mean depth varied from 1.9 to 8.0 m. Morphoedaphic indices varied from 16.7 to 54.3. Water quality was fairly uniform with moderate concentrations of dissolved sol ids total filterable residue slightly above 100 mg/L), calcium and bicarbonate at the major ions, and low phosphorus levels. Waters were clear, largely unstained, and generally well oxygenated. Water quality in most lakes was highly suitable for fish production. Ten species of fish were recorded. All lakes supported northern pike while only five contained walleye. Lake whitefish was present in all but one lake. Yellow perch, although recorded in seven of the lakes, were slow growing and small in size. Estimates of potential fish yield varied from 4.8 to 6.5 kg/ha/yr to 8.2 to 10.9 kg/ha/yr. Mean total alkalinity of the study lakes was 77 mg/L (1.53 meq/L). Although terrestrial buffering responses were uncertain, it appeared that lakes are not highly susceptible to acidification (i.e., at precipitation acidities foreseeable for the study area).

A fisheries and water quality survey of ten lakes in the Richardson Tower area Northeastern Alberta. Volume II: Data


Author(s): Ash, G. R., & Noton L. R.

Year: 1980

Abstract:
A fisheries and water quality survey was conducted in September 1979 on 10 small lakes (67.4 to 338.9 hal in the vicinity of Richardson Tower, approximately 140 km north of Fort McMurray, Alberta). The major objectives were: (1) to determine morphometric and water quality characteristics in relation to habitat requirements for indigenous and possible introduced species of fish; (2) to assess potential fish yield; and (3) to determine the susceptibility of the lakes to acidification. This information is contained in Volume I. Volume I I contains all data collected for this study.

A review and assessment of existing information for key wildlife and fish species in the Regional Sustainable Development Strategy study area. Volume 1: Wildlife


Year: 2002

Abstract:
This report summarizes the life history and habitat requirements, distribution and population characteristics (e.g., size and trends) of key wildlife species and communities in the Regional Sustainable Development Strategy (RSDS) study area of northeastern Alberta. A summary of information on key fish species is presented in Volume 2 of this report. Key wildlife included 7 priority #1 species/communities (woodland caribou, moose, muskrat, fisher/small mammal, lynx/snowshoe hare, old growth forest bird community, and Canadian toad) and 8 priority #2 species/communities (black bear, beaver, river otter, ruffed grouse, pileated woodpecker, boreal owl, mixedwood forest bird community, and ducks and geese). Key fish included 2 priority #1 species (northern pike and walleye) and 4 priority #2 species (lake whitefish, Arctic grayling, longnose sucker, and burbot). The information presented in this report is organized into detailed species and community accounts. Data was compiled from numerous sources, including government, industry, university and private/ non-profit organizations. Over 300 published and unpublished reports were reviewed to assimilate the information presented in this report. Habitat/life history requirements for each wildlife species were summarized as general living, foraging, reproducing, protective/thermal cover and migrating/ moving habitat requirements. Habitat elements that characterize moderate-high suitability habitats were also identified based on the results of existing habitat suitability index (HSI) models. Population sizes and trends, as well as the natural variability in population size, were reported where possible. Limited information was available on the population dynamics of most species. Information on population trends was augmented by a discussion of habitat trends within the oil sands area using the results of Cumulative Effects Assessments for various oil sands development projects. Data collected from oil sands projects, as well as other sources, on species sightings/ occurrences and important habitat areas were mapped using GIS. Finally, information gaps pertaining to habitat use, habitat requirements, and population characteristics for each key species/ community were identified.

A socio-economic study of Fort Chipewyan, the Peace Athabasca Delta and the Lake Athabasca region


Year: 1973

Abstract:
Within this broader Socio-economic study of the Peace-Athabasca Delta, the section on the economy includes some information on trapping, fishing, resource use, resource access, some Aboriginal communities, and subsistence harvesting, while a later section discusses the area's resource base, including human, fur, fish, forest, minerals, soil, wildlife, cultural and historical resources. The purpose of the study was to examine the impact of low water levels on area resources and resource use. This is not a traditional land use or knowledge study, but there is information from a non-Aboriginal perspective on resource use from the early years of commercial development in Peace-Athabasca Delta.

A socio-economic study of Fort Chipewyan, the Peace-Athabasca Delta and the Lake Athabasca Region


Year: 1971

Abstract:
Study to counteract the adverse effects of low water levels, caused by the Bennett Dam, on the fur and fish economy of the Fort Chipewyan community. Includes population profile and relocation experience of community members. Discusses past and present economic patterns, such as trapping, fishing, forestry, mining & explorations, tourism, agriculture, including exploitation of those potentially beneficial activities. Indicates roles to be taken by private sector and government. Recommends socio-economic improvement through a combination of social assistance and development of employment, economic diversity and vocational opportunity.

A synopsis of information relating to aquatic ecosystems toxicology within the Alberta oil sands area


Author(s): Jantzie, T. D.

Year: 1977

Abstract:
“A Synopsis of the Physical and Biological Limnology and Fishery Programs within the Alberta Oil Sands Area\" forms a background reference document on the limnology of the AOSER Program study area in northeastern Alberta. Within the report, the following items are discussed and summarized: data on regional water quality, hydrology, physical and chemical limnology, and fisheries resources of the lakes and streams within the Program area. An extensive bibliography of the pertinent literature for the area is included.

Accumulation of fish mixed function oxygenase inducers by semipermeable membrane devices in river water and effluents, Athabasca River, August and September 1994


Year: 1996

Abstract:
Semipermeable Membrane Devices (SPMDs) were deployed for 2 weeks in waters ofthe Athabasca and Lesser Slave Rivers and in four pulp mill effluents and wastewater from one oil sands mining and upgrading facility. Success of recovery of the SPMDs was 66 %, with loss caused by high water velocity and shifting channels and sediments. SPMD extracts accumulated chemicals that induced mixed function oxygenase (MFO) in a fish cell line. For expressing the potency of SPMD extracts as inducers in fish cells, MFO induction in cells exposed to SPMD extracts was compared to MFO induction in cells exposed to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p- dioxin (TCDD). This does not imply that the SPMD extracts contained TCDD or any other dioxin or furan, only that the extracts contained chemicals that were equivalent in MFO-inducing potency to a certain amount of TCDD. MFO induction was expressed as "EROD potency equivalents in pg/g". Extracts of SPMDs from pulp mills were two to five times as potent as extracts of SPMDs exposed to background river water. SPMD extracts from three of the four pulp mill effluents tested (Weldwood, Alberta Newsprint and Slave Lake Pulp) had 62.0, 53.5, and 29.7 pg EROD potency-EQ/g, respectively, significantly more than in Athabasca River water (12.6 pg EROD potency-EQ/g = "background"). SPMDs exposed to effluent from Millar Western (23.0 pg EROD potency-EQ/g) had potencies within the 95 % confidence interval o f background. The levels of MFO induction in SPMDs exposed to river water increased downstream of Fort McMurray. In this area, SPMDs accumulated inducers from the river at levels ranging from 58.5 to 728 pg EROD potency-EQ/g. SPMD accumulation was highly variable, which indicated an unknown source of inducers, possibly an effluent from the town or input from natural erosion of the oil sands. SPMDs deployed in effluent from Suncor accumulated the most MFO-inducing chemicals (16,800 pg EROD potency-EQ/g), with induction potency over 20 x that of SPMDs from river water upstream of Suncor. Although this study was preliminary, the results indicated that SPMDs from the four pulp mill effluents contained small quantities of MFO inducers. Compared to MFO induction by extracts of SPMDs deployed in two Ontario bleached kraft mill effluents, the pulp mill effluents from the Athabasca River were one third to one twentieth as potent. By contrast, very high quantities of MFO inducers were accumulated from Suncor effluents. SPMDs deployed in Athabasca River waters downstream of Fort McMurray also contained inducers, indicating some unknown anthropogenic or natural source in this area.

Acute lethality of mine depressurization water to trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) and rainbow trout (Salmo Gaidneri). Vol II. Backup data


Author(s): Lake, W., & Rogers W.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
Volume 2 In order to conduct oil sands mining operations in the surface mining region of the Athabasca oil sands deposits, most regions require depressurization of the basal sandstone formations. The groundwater produced by depressurization operations is of poor enough quality to be toxic to fish. The purpose of this project is to provide information regarding the acute lethality of oil sands mining and extraction plant wastewaters to fish. Specific objectives were to provide toxicity information on a specific wastewater using Athabasca River water as the diluent and to compare the value of field toxicity studies and the predictive accuracy of laboratory bioassays using treated waters rather than natural waters.

Acute lethality of mine depressurization water to trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) and rainbow trout (Salmo Gaidneri). Volume I.


Author(s): Lake, W., & Rogers W.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
Mine depressurization water obtained from five wells on Lease 17 held by Syncrude Canada Limited, was examined for chemical composition and acute toxicity to two species of fish. In the first series of experiments, mine depressurization water was diluted with various proportions of water obtained from the Athabasca River, and trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) were exposed to these mixtures for up to 10 days. These experiments were performed in a mobile laboratory located in Fort McMurray. The 96-hour lethal concentrations (LC50's) ranged from 20% by volume (Well No.5) to 48% by volume (Well No.1). The 96-hour LCso's for the composite samples ranged from 35% by volume to 45% by volume. Similar studies were undertaken in the second series of experiments in Edmonton, using rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) with Edmonton City water as the diluent. Four of the five wells previously tested were studied, with resulting 96 hour LC50's of between 20% and 40% by volume for Well No.2, and 60% and 80% by volume for the other three wells. In addition, a study was performed on a composite of these four wells to determine the effect of storage time on toxicity. It was observed that toxicity decreased after 10 days storage (96-hour LC50's of between 40% and 60% volume to between 60% and 80% by volume) but then increased (96-hour LC50 of 15.2% by volume) after 20 days storage. Considerable variations in toxicity were found between wells and even water from a single well varied in toxicity depending on the time the sample was obtained and how long it had been stored. Variations in the chemical composition of the mine depressurization water were observed for such components as zinc, nickel, and iron between sample periods, as well as for concentrations of sodium, chloride, and other components from well to well.

Acute lethality of mine depressurization water to trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): Volume I


Author(s): Lake, W., & Rogers W.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
Mine depressurization water obtained from five wells on Lease 17 held by Syncrude Canada Limited, was examined for chemical composition and acute toxicity to two species of fish. In the first series of experiments, mine depressurization water was diluted with various proportions of water obtained from the Athabasca River, and trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) were exposed to these mixtures for up to 10 days. These experiments were performed in a mobile laboratory located in Fort McMurray. The 96-hour lethal concentrations (LC50's) ranged from 20% by volume (Well No.5) to 48% by volume (Well No.1). The 96-hour LCso's for the composite samples ranged from 35% by volume to 45% by volume. Similar studies were undertaken in the second series of experiments in Edmonton, using rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) with Edmonton City water as the diluent. Four of the five wells previously tested were studied, with resulting 96 hour LC50's of between 20% and 40% by volume for Well No.2, and 60% and 80% by volume for the other three wells. In addition, a study was performed on a composite of these four wells to determine the effect of storage time on toxicity. It was observed that toxicity decreased after 10 days storage (96-hour LC50's of between 40% and 60% volume to between 60% and 80% by volume) but then increased (96-hour LC50 of 15.2% by volume) after 20 days storage. Considerable variations in toxicity were found between wells and even water from a single well varied in toxicity depending on the time the sample was obtained and how long it had been stored. Variations in the chemical composition of the mine depressurization water were observed for such components as zinc, nickel, and iron between sample periods, as well as for concentrations of sodium, chloride, and other components from well to well.

Acute lethality of mine depressurization water to trout-perch (Percopsis omiscomaycus) and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): Volume II


Author(s): Lake, W., & Rogers W.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
Volume 2 In order to conduct oil sands mining operations in the surface mining region of the Athabasca oil sands deposits, most regions require depressurization of the basal sandstone formations. The groundwater produced by depressurization operations is of poor enough quality to be toxic to fish. The purpose of this project is to provide information regarding the acute lethality of oil sands mining and extraction plant wastewaters to fish. Specific objectives were to provide toxicity information on a specific wastewater using Athabasca River water as the diluent and to compare the value of field toxicity studies and the predictive accuracy of laboratory bioassays using treated waters rather than natural waters.

Acute lethality study of G.C.O.S. dike filter drainage using rainbow trout and brook sticklebacks


Author(s): Lake, W. H.

Year: 1976

Abstract:
When evaluating this data, lethality (i.e. death of the organism) is the symptom being observed. Acutely lethal refers to a sample killing 50% of a population after 96 hours exposure. 1. The dike filter drainage was found to be acutely toxic to both rainbow trout and brook sticklebacks. The results of the bioassays on rainbow trout confirmed those results of S. Hrudey of the Environmental Protection Service, Environment Canada. 2. At the point of entry of the effluent, the sample was acutely lethal to rainbow trout and showed a slight degree of lethality to brook sticklebacks. 3. The downstream samples were not lethal to brook sticklebacks and demonstrated a slight degree of lethality to rainbow trout 10 - 15 feet downstream. 4. The downstream sample taken from the boat dock was not lethal to sticklebacks or rainbow trout. 5. When considering the bioassay data and excluding the point of entry of the effluent into the river, the G.C.O.S. dike filter drainage does not present a significant lethality problem to fish. 6. Acute lethality in the dike filter drainage is probably due to a combination of chemicals and not due to the action of one individual component. Ammonia and surfactants would be two chemicals making major contributions. 7. The lethal action of the interface, i.e., point of entry, is also due to the combination of the chemicals and the effect is reduced due to dilution with river water.

Acute toxicity of oil sands wastewater: A toxic balance


Year: 1994

Abstract:
A study was conducted to identify and determine the relative importance of the acutely toxic fractions of wastewater from oil sands extraction using a bioassay directed toxicity identification evaluation (TIE), to use these data to construct a toxic balance, and to determine whether the same fractions were acutely toxic to Microtox, Daphnia, and rainbow trout. Samples of extraction wastewater were obtained from the Mildred Lake tailings pond in Alberta during summer 1991 and 1992. The samples were centrifuged to remove suspended solids and the toxicity of the supernatant was evaluated. Seven manipulations, each of which was designed to remove a different class of compounds, was performed on the supernatant samples. A complete TIE was performed using the Microtox bacterial bioassay. All acute toxicity of the surface tailings pond water to Microtox was removed by precipitation of organic acids or by removal of nonpolar organics. These results suggest that the main toxic fraction was a surfactant. In the interstitial water of the fine tails, volatiles accounted for 15% of the acute toxicity. However, all the acute toxicity of interstitial water was removed by precipitation of organic acids or by removal of nonpolar organics. Organic acids accounted for all the acute toxicity of tailings pond water to Daphnia and rainbow trout. Differences in relative sensitivity of test organisms to the toxic fraction demonstrate the importance of using more than one test organism to evaluate acute toxicity. Daphnia was 0.4 times less sensitive and rainbow trout 3 times more sensitive than Microtox. 20 refs., 6 tabs

An examination of the toxic properties of water extracts in the vicinity of an oil sand extraction site


Year: 2011

Abstract:
The industrial extraction of oil sands (OS) in northern Alberta, Canada, has raised concerns about the quality of the Athabasca River. The purpose of this study was to examine the toxic properties of various water extracts on Oncorhynchus mykiss trout hepatocytes. The water samples were fractionated on a reverse-phase C(18) cartridge and the levels of light-, medium- and heavy-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. Primary cultures of trout hepatocytes were exposed for 48 h at 15 °C to increasing concentrations of the C(18) extract corresponding to 0.02, 0.1, 0.5 and 2.5X concentrations from upstream/downstream sites in the Athabasca River, lake and groundwater samples, OS tailings and interceptor well-water samples. Changes in cell viability, phase I and phase II biotransformation enzymes (cytochrome P4501A and glutathione S-transferase activities), oxidative damage (lipid peroxidation LPO) and genotoxicity (single and double DNA strand breaks) were monitored in post-exposure cells. The water samples decreased cell viability and increased all the above endpoints at thresholds of between 0.02 and 0.1X the water concentration. The most responsive biomarker was DNA damage but it also offered the least discrimination among sites. LPO was higher at sites downstream of the industrial operations compared to upstream sites. A decision tree analysis was performed to formulate a set of rules by which to identify the distinctive properties of each type of water samples. The analysis revealed that OS tailings and interceptor waters were characterized by an increased concentration in light PAHs (>42 μg L(-1)) and this fraction represented more than 85% of the total PAHs. These samples also inhibited GST activity, which could compromise the elimination of genotoxic PAHs present in the system. An analysis of groundwater samples revealed a contamination pattern similar to that for OS tailings. There is a need for more research into specific biomarkers of toxicity from OS tailings compounds such as naphthenic acids, light PAHs among others, which are a characteristic fingerprint of OS extraction activities.

An intensive study of the fish fauna of the Muskeg River watershed of northeastern Alberta Vol I (Interim report)


Author(s): Bond, W. A., & Machniak K.

Year: 1977

Abstract:
The fish fauna of the Muskeg River was studied during spring and summer, 1976. Migrations of non-resident fish from the Athabasca River into the Muskeg River watershed were monitored through the use of a two-way counting fence between 28 April and 30 July. A total of 6153 fish were passed through the upstream trap of which white suckers (46%) and longnose suckers (46%) comprised the vast majority. Arctic grayling (5%) and northern pike (2%) accounted for most of the remainder. After spawning in the lower reaches of the Muskeg River, migrant suckers of both species returned to the Athabasca River. Arctic grayling, however, remained in the tributary throughout the summer. Floy tags applied to 2269 migrant fish yielded a 1.2% return rate for fish recaptured outside the Muskeg watershed. Small fish collections made throughout the summer demonstrated the importance of the lower Muskeg drainage as a rearing area for young of-the year white suckers, longnose suckers and Arctic grayling. Lake chub, slimy sculpin and brook stickleback were the most abundant forage fish species.

Aquatic biophysical inventory of major tributaries in the AOSERP study area. Volume 1: Summary report


Year: 1980

Abstract:
This report summarizes and compares the physical charac- teristics of nine streams within five watersheds (Firebag, Muskeg, Steepbank, MacKay, and Ells) in the AOSERP study area. The distri- butions and relative abundances of fish in each stream and watershed are also described and related to the physical characteristics that tend to promote or limit sport fish production. The system of reach classification and biophysical measurements developed by Chamberlin and Humphries (1977) was used throughout the present study. The detailed results of this study are presented in the accompanying atlas that forms Volume II of this report (Walder et al. 1980). From 16 to 24 species of fish were found in each watershed. Forage fish (lake chub, pearl dace, longnose dace, trout-perch, brook stickleback, slimy sculpin) and white and longnose suckers were the most abundant fish in every stream or river studied. The most important and widespread sport fish present were (in order of decreasing abundance) arctic grayling, northern pike, and walleye. Other species of sport fish (burbot, lake whitefish, mountain whitefish, yellow perch, Dolly Varden, and goldeye) were found in small numbers, and were almost always confined to the lower reaches of the rivers in proximity to the Athabasca River. A good correlation was found between physical characteristics of streams and the distributions and abundances of fish. Present information suggests that the following general ratings for sport fish potential can be applied to the five water- sheds that were studied: Firebag River watershed, excellent; Muskeg River watershed, poor to moderate; Steepbank River, moderate; MacKay River watershed, poor to p.ossibly moderate; and Ells River, excellent. These ratings are based only-on comparisons among the studied watersheds; they do not consider productivity of other water-or beyond the boundaries of the AOSERP study area.

Aquatic biophysical inventory of major tributaries in the AOSERP study area. Volume I: Summary report


Year: 1980

Abstract:
This report summarizes and compares the physical characteristics of nine streams within five watersheds (Firebag, Muskeg, Steepbank, MacKay, and Ells) in the AOSERP study area. The distributions and relative abundances of fish in each stream and watershed are also described and related to the physical characteristics that tend to promote or limit sport fish production. The system of reach classification and biophysical measurements developed by Chamberlin and Humphries (1977) was used throughout the present study. The detailed results of this study are presented in the accompanying atlas that forms Volume II of this report (Walder et al. 1980). From 16 to 24 species of fish were found in each watershed. Forage fish (lake chub, pearl dace, longnose dace, trout-perch, brook stickleback, slimy sculpin) and white and longnose suckers were the most abundant fish in every stream or river studied. The most important and widespread sport fish present were (in order of decreasing abundance) arctic grayling, northern pike, and walleye. Other species of sport fish (burbot, lake whitefish, mountain whitefish, yellow perch, Dolly Varden, and goldeye) were found in small numbers, and were almost always confined to the lower reaches of the rivers in proximity to the Athabasca River. A good correlation was found between physical characteristics of streams and the distributions and abundances of fish. Present information suggests that the following general ratings for sport fish potential can be applied to the five watersheds that were studied: Firebag River watershed, excellent; Muskeg River watershed, poor to moderate; Steepbank River, moderate; MacKay River watershed, poor to possibly moderate; and Ells River, excellent. These ratings are based only-on comparisons among the studied watersheds; they do not consider productivity of other watersheds within or beyond the boundaries of the AOSERP study area.

Assessing accumulation and biliary excretion of naphthenic acids in yellow perch exposed to oil sands-affected waters


Year: 2014

Abstract:
Naphthenic acids are known to be the most prevalent group of organic compounds in oil sands tailings-associated waters. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were exposed for four months to oil sands-influenced waters in two experimental systems located on an oil sands lease 30 km north of Fort McMurray Alberta: the Demonstration Pond, containing oil sands tailings capped with natural surface water, and the South Bison Pond, integrating lean oil sands. Yellow perch were also sampled from three lakes: Mildred Lake that receives water from the Athabasca River, Sucker Lake, at the edge of oil sands extraction activity, and Kimowin Lake, a distant reference site. Naphthenic acids were measured in perch muscle tissue using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). Bile metabolites were measured by GC–MS techniques and by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection at phenanthrene wavelengths. A method was developed using liquid chromatography–high resolution mass spectrometry (LC–HRMS) to evaluate naphthenic acids in bile. Tissue analysis did not show a pattern of naphthenic acids accumulation in muscle tissue consistent with known concentrations in exposed waters. Bile fluorescence and LC–HRMS methods were capable of statistically distinguishing samples originating from oil sands-influenced waters versus reference lakes. Although the GC–MS and HPLC fluorescence methods were correlated, there were no significant correlations of these methods and the LC–HRMS method. In yellow perch, naphthenic acids from oil sands sources do not concentrate in tissue at a measurable amount and are excreted through a biliary route. LC–HRMS was shown to be a highly sensitive, selective and promising technique as an indicator of exposure of biota to oil sands-derived naphthenic acids.