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Baptiste Lake


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Location

Athabasca, AB
Canada

Baptiste Lake


Year: 1989

Citation:
[Anonymous] (1989).  Baptiste Lake. 8.

Baptiste Lake


Year: 1989

Citation:
[Anonymous] (1989).  Baptiste Lake. Sessional Paper SP 91/622,

Baptiste Lake


Author(s): Prepas, E. E.

Year: 1990

Citation:

Ecological responses of cisco (Coregonus artedi) to hypolimnetic oxygenation in Amisk Lake, Alberta


Author(s): Aku, P. K. M.

Year: 1995

Abstract:
I examined responses of cisco (Coregonus artedi) to hypolimnetic oxygenation in Amisk Lake during the summers of 1989-1992. One basin of this double-basined eutrophic lake was oxygenated, whereas the second basin, and the nearby, untreated Baptiste Lake, served as reference systems. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations in the hypolimnion of both basins of Amisk Lake increased during treatment but were higher in the treated basin than in the reference basin. Hypolimnetic DO in the treated basin remained above concentrations avoided by cisco ($<$1.3 mg$\cdot$L$\sp{-1})$ but fell below this level by mid-summer in the reference basin. Consequently, cisco habitat extended up to 8 m deeper in the hypolimnion of the treated basin than in the reference basin. Variations in monthly densities suggested that cisco in Amisk Lake also responded to hypolimnetic oxygenation by migrating from the reference basin into the treated basin. This behavioral response, coupled with deeper vertical extensions of fish habitat, resulted in the treated basin supporting a density and biomass of fish that was twice as great as in the reference basin. Higher DO concentrations enabled cisco in the treated basin to feed deeper into the hypolimnion, and incorporate more benthic species into their diets, than those in the reference basin. Increased DO concentrations in both basins resulted in expansion of whole-lake cisco habitat, and whole-lake fish density increased 5-fold and corresponding biomass tripled during treatment. Although prey base for cisco increased during oxysenation, per capita food quantity decreased. Growth rate and condition of cisco in Amisk Lake also decreased during treatment years cnmpared with pretreatment data, suggesting a density-dependent relationship with biomass. In contrast, in llntreated Baptiste Lake, where the hypolimnion remained anoxic each summer, cisco were restricted to epilimnetic waters, and density, biomass, and growth rate remained low. These results suggest thst through expansion of suitable habitat, hypolimnetic oxygenation can enhance cold-water fish production, especially if combined with regulated fish exploitation.

Effects of regulatory mechanisms on anglers and walleye populations in northern Alberta lakes


Author(s): Jabs, J. H.

Year: 2002

Abstract:
Recreational angling pressure in Northern Alberta has reduced sportfish populations to near critical levels in some locations and traditional regulatory efforts have typically been ineffective in preventing the decline of walleye populations. This research uses data from the Northern River Basins Study to produce a model of anglers' site preferences in a random utility model. These angler preference estimates are combined with a walleye biological model and further developed into an integrated economic and ecological framework. In this modelling framework, regulation scenarios are implemented to control lake access, simulate site closure, limit angler effort to a maximum level, and add various fee programs. The best policy options appear to be the site fee and angler effort quotas, which stabilize fish populations and have less welfare loss comparatively. However, regardless of their positive impacts on walleye populations, new regulatory tools will unequivocally decrease overall angler utility.

Impact of hypolimnetic oxygenation on profundal macroinvertebrates in a eutrophic lake in central Alberta


Author(s): Dinsmore, W. P.

Year: 1995

Abstract:
Profundal (15 to 25 m) macroinvertebrate responses to hypolimnetic oxygenation in Amisk Lake, Alberta, were dominated by Chironomus spp. Mean densities and biomasses of C. anthracinus at 25 m increased 55- and 109-fold, respectively, in the treated basin, but major changes in abundance were not apparent until 2 yrs after treatment commenced. Densities of C. anthracinus increased similarly in the reference basin, but mean larval weights and biomasses were significantly lower than in the treated basin (paired t-test, P $<$ 0.001). Anoxic conditions, rather than low temperatures, appeared to limit profundal C. anthracinus distribution in Amisk Lake. Densities and biomasses of C-cucini were higher in the reference basin than in the treated basin of Amisk Lake. Densities of C. decorus and C. plumosus group increased in the treated basin but remained of minor importance. In comparison, densities of C. cucini and C. plumosus group in Baptiste Lake, a reference site, declined over the study period. Densities of other macroinvertebrate taxa remained low in the profundal region of Amisk Lake. Shannon-Weaver indices of diversity decreased as oxygenation processed, in contrast to aeration studies in other locations. Increased Chironomus spp. abundance in Amisk Lake suggested an increase in fish food, but fish foraging below 15 m was restricted by low DO concentrations and water temperatures. The relationship between profundal macroinvertebrate biomass (PMB) and DO concentrations has never been empirically investigated. PMB estimates from 32 Alberta lakes of moderate to high primary productivity (mean summer total phosphorus concentration 57 $\pm$ 9 $\mu$g$\cdot$L$\sp{-1}$) were regressed against DO concentrations and additional trophic, morphometric, and water chemistry variables. Minimum open-water DO concentrations explained 38% of the variance in PMB at sites where minimum DO was $<$4 mg$\rm\cdot L\sp{-1}$, but accounted for no detectable variation when minimum DO was $>$4 mg$\rm\cdot L\sp{-1}$. Bottom slope (12%) and specific conductivity (4%) increased to 55% the amount of variance explained for PMB at sites where minimum DO was $<$4 mg$\rm\cdot L\sp{-1}$. Variables indicative of phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a, total phosphorus, and Secchi transparency) were nonsignificant in Alberta lakes, suggesting that food was non-limiting for profundal macroinvertebrates in these predominantly eutrophic lakes. These results suggest that DO concentrations hold potential as a predictor of PMB in eutrophic lakes.