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Medicine Lake


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Improvement District No. 12 AB
Canada

Medicine Lake


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Clearwater County AB
Canada

Heavy metal warning for Fort Chip residents; Scientists present Athabasca River study


Author(s): Brooymans, H.

Year: Submitted

Abstract:
The oilsands industry is boosting the amount of toxic metals in the Athabasca River, as well as in the area surrounding the plant sites, University of Alberta aquatics ecologist David Schindler told Fort Chipewyan residents on Monday.

JACOS Hangingstone SAGD Demonstration Project: Traditional land use study for the Fort McMurray No. 468 First Nation


Year: 2000

Abstract:
The purpose of this Traditional Land Use Study was to ensure that information on traditional land use in the surrounding region (JACOS Hanging stone project located approximately 50 kilometres south-southwest of Fort McMurray in Twp 84 Rge 11 W4M) was current and relevant so that potential impacts from the JACOS Hangingstone project to traditional land use could be reduced or effectively mitigated. The objectives were to document the traditional environmental and historical knowledge of the FMFN; identify and map significant sites such as important medicinal plant and berry-harvesting areas, historical gathering places, graves, cabins, traplines, sweat lodges, salt licks, etc.; to identify any concerns that people have about the existing developments, the proposed development, and the potential cumulative impacts; to produce a report and a series of maps that display the JACOS Hangingstone project and the traditional uses in the TLUS study area; to identify potential ways to reduce or mitigate the possible impacts of the proposed JACOS Hangingstone project; and to protect confidential or sensitive, site specific information. The body of this report describes the communities in the region; the participants involved in the TLUS, and review other relevant TLU studies. It summarizes information on hunting, trapping, berry and medicinal plant collecting in the study area, as well as information on historical and cultural sites. A list of concerns is presented and recommendations are made on ways to alleviate potential conflicts between traditional users and the oil and gas industry. Appendix A presents the full results of the interviews, including historical and cultural material, ecological knowledge, and the concerns of the participants. Appendix B summarizes information (obtained from published literature) on plants used by the aboriginal people of Northern Alberta for food, medicine, ceremonies and construction. Appendix C is a list of terms referring to aboriginal people. Appendix D lists locations of specific features in the study area, such as salt licks, cabins, spiritual sites, and medicinal plant sites. To protect the locations of these sensitive sites, Appendix D is not issued with this report but is available upon request from the FMFN No. 468. Copies of Appendix D have been issued to the FMFN, JACOS Ltd., and AXYS Environmental Consulting.

Labour Force Estimates by Industry and by Occupation (2 and 3 Digits) for Selected Alberta Economic Regions (Annual Average) (1987 - 2011)


Year: 2015

Abstract:
(StatCan Product) Customization details:  This information product has been customized to present information on labour force estimates by industry and by occupation (2 and 3 digits) for Alberta’s Economic Regions (excluding Edmonton and Calgary) from 1987 to 2011 (annual averages).  The LFS characteristics presented are:  - Labour Force     - Employment  The Economic Regions presented are:  - Lethbridge – Medicine Hat - Camrose – Drumheller - Banff- Jasper – Rocky Mountain House - Red Deer - Athabasca – Grande Prairie – Peace River - Wood Buffalo – Cold Lake   Labour Force Survey  The Canadian Labour Force Survey was developed following the Second World War to satisfy a need for reliable and timely data on the labour market. Information was urgently required on the massive labour market changes involved in the transition from a war to a peace-time economy. The main objective of the LFS is to divide the working-age population into three mutually exclusive classifications - employed, unemployed, and not in the labour force - and to provide descriptive and explanatory data on each of these.  Target population  The LFS covers the civilian, non-institutionalized population 15 years of age and over. It is conducted nationwide, in both the provinces and the territories. Excluded from the survey's coverage are: persons living on reserves and other Aboriginal settlements in the provinces; full-time members of the Canadian Armed Forces and the institutionalized population. These groups together represent an exclusion of less than 2% of the Canadian population aged 15 and over. National Labour Force Survey estimates are derived using the results of the LFS in the provinces. Territorial LFS results are not included in the national estimates, but are published separately.  Instrument design  The current LFS questionnaire was introduced in 1997. At that time, significant changes were made to the questionnaire in order to address existing data gaps, improve data quality and make more use of the power of Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI). The changes incorporated included the addition of many new questions. For example, questions were added to collect information about wage rates, union status, job permanency and workplace size for the main job of currently employed employees. Other additions included new questions to collect information about hirings and separations, and expanded response category lists that split existing codes into more detailed categories.  Sampling  This is a sample survey with a cross-sectional design.  Data sources  Responding to this survey is mandatory. Data are collected directly from survey respondents. Data collection for the LFS is carried out each month during the week following the LFS reference week. The reference week is normally the week containing the 15th day of the month. LFS interviews are conducted by telephone by interviewers working out of a regional office CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews) site or by personal visit from a field interviewer. Since 2004, dwellings new to the sample in urban areas are contacted by telephone if the telephone number is available from administrative files, otherwise the dwelling is contacted by a field interviewer. The interviewer first obtains socio-demographic information for each household member and then obtains labour force information for all members aged 15 and over who are not members of the regular armed forces. The majority of subsequent interviews are conducted by telephone. In subsequent monthly interviews the interviewer confirms the socio-demographic information collected in the first month and collects the labour force information for the current month. Persons aged 70 and over are not asked the labour force questions in subsequent interviews, but rather their labour force information is carried over from their first interview. In each dwelling, information about all household members is usually obtained from one knowledgeable household member. Such 'proxy' reporting, which accounts for approximately 65% of the information collected, is used to avoid the high cost and extended time requirements that would be involved in repeat visits or calls necessary to obtain information directly from each respondent.  Error detection  The LFS CAI questionnaire incorporates many features that serve to maximize the quality of the data collected. There are many edits built into the CAI questionnaire to compare the entered data against unusual values, as well as to check for logical inconsistencies. Whenever an edit fails, the interviewer is prompted to correct the information (with the help of the respondent when necessary). For most edit failures the interviewer has the ability to override the edit failure if they cannot resolve the apparent discrepancy. As well, for most questions the interviewer has the ability to enter a response of Don't Know or Refused if the respondent does not answer the question. Once the data is received back at head office an extensive series of processing steps is undertaken to thoroughly verify each record received. This includes the coding of industry and occupation information and the review of interviewer entered notes. The editing and imputation phases of processing involve the identification of logically inconsistent or missing information items, and the correction of such conditions. Since the true value of each entry on the questionnaire is not known, the identification of errors can be done only through recognition of obvious inconsistencies (for example, a 15 year-old respondent who is recorded as having last worked in 1940).  Estimation  The final step in the processing of LFS data is the assignment of a weight to each individual record. This process involves several steps. Each record has an initial weight that corresponds to the inverse of the probability of selection. Adjustments are made to this weight to account for non-response that cannot be handled through imputation. In the final weighting step all of the record weights are adjusted so that the aggregate totals will match with independently derived population estimates for various age-sex groups by province and major sub-provincial areas. One feature of the LFS weighting process is that all individuals within a dwelling are assigned the same weight. In January 2000, the LFS introduced a new estimation method called Regression Composite Estimation. This new method was used to re-base all historical LFS data. It is described in the research paper ""Improvements to the Labour Force Survey (LFS)"", Catalogue no. 71F0031X. Additional improvements are introduced over time; they are described in different issues of the same publication.  Data accuracy  Since the LFS is a sample survey, all LFS estimates are subject to both sampling error and non-sampling errors. Non-sampling errors can arise at any stage of the collection and processing of the survey data. These include coverage errors, non-response errors, response errors, interviewer errors, coding errors and other types of processing errors. Non-response to the LFS tends to average about 10% of eligible households. Interviews are instructed to make all reasonable attempts to obtain LFS interviews with members of eligible households. Each month, after all attempts to obtain interviews have been made, a small number of non-responding households remain. For households non-responding to the LFS, a weight adjustment is applied to account for non-responding households. Sampling errors associated with survey estimates are measured using coefficients of variation for LFS estimates as a function of the size of the estimate and the geographic area.

Labour Force Estimates by Industry and by Occupation (2 and 3 digits) for Selected Alberta Economic Regions (Annual Average) (2000-2013)


Year: 2015

Abstract:
(StatCan Product) Customization details:  This information product has been customized to present information on labour force estimates by industry and by occupation (2 and 3 digits) for Alberta’s Economic Regions (excluding Edmonton and Calgary) from 2000 to 2013 using annual averages.  The LFS characteristics presented are:  - Labour Force     - Employment  The economic regions presented are:  - Lethbridge – Medicine Hat - Camrose – Drumheller - Banff- Jasper – Rocky Mountain House - Red Deer - Athabasca – Grande Prairie – Peace River - Wood Buffalo – Cold Lake   For more information about the occupations and industries presented, contact OSI.Support@gov.ab.ca  Labour Force Survey  The Canadian Labour Force Survey was developed following the Second World War to satisfy a need for reliable and timely data on the labour market. Information was urgently required on the massive labour market changes involved in the transition from a war to a peace-time economy. The main objective of the LFS is to divide the working-age population into three mutually exclusive classifications - employed, unemployed, and not in the labour force - and to provide descriptive and explanatory data on each of these.  Target population  The LFS covers the civilian, non-institutionalized population 15 years of age and over. It is conducted nationwide, in both the provinces and the territories. Excluded from the survey's coverage are: persons living on reserves and other Aboriginal settlements in the provinces; full-time members of the Canadian Armed Forces and the institutionalized population. These groups together represent an exclusion of less than 2% of the Canadian population aged 15 and over. National Labour Force Survey estimates are derived using the results of the LFS in the provinces. Territorial LFS results are not included in the national estimates, but are published separately.  Documentation – Labour Force Survey  Instrument design  The current LFS questionnaire was introduced in 1997. At that time, significant changes were made to the questionnaire in order to address existing data gaps, improve data quality and make more use of the power of Computer Assisted Interviewing (CAI). The changes incorporated included the addition of many new questions. For example, questions were added to collect information about wage rates, union status, job permanency and workplace size for the main job of currently employed employees. Other additions included new questions to collect information about hirings and separations, and expanded response category lists that split existing codes into more detailed categories.  Sampling  This is a sample survey with a cross-sectional design.  Data sources  Responding to this survey is mandatory. Data are collected directly from survey respondents. Data collection for the LFS is carried out each month during the week following the LFS reference week. The reference week is normally the week containing the 15th day of the month. LFS interviews are conducted by telephone by interviewers working out of a regional office CATI (Computer Assisted Telephone Interviews) site or by personal visit from a field interviewer. Since 2004, dwellings new to the sample in urban areas are contacted by telephone if the telephone number is available from administrative files, otherwise the dwelling is contacted by a field interviewer. The interviewer first obtains socio-demographic information for each household member and then obtains labour force information for all members aged 15 and over who are not members of the regular armed forces. The majority of subsequent interviews are conducted by telephone. In subsequent monthly interviews the interviewer confirms the socio-demographic information collected in the first month and collects the labour force information for the current month. Persons aged 70 and over are not asked the labour force questions in subsequent interviews, but rather their labour force information is carried over from their first interview. In each dwelling, information about all household members is usually obtained from one knowledgeable household member. Such 'proxy' reporting, which accounts for approximately 65% of the information collected, is used to avoid the high cost and extended time requirements that would be involved in repeat visits or calls necessary to obtain information directly from each respondent.  Error detection  The LFS CAI questionnaire incorporates many features that serve to maximize the quality of the data collected. There are many edits built into the CAI questionnaire to compare the entered data against unusual values, as well as to check for logical inconsistencies. Whenever an edit fails, the interviewer is prompted to correct the information (with the help of the respondent when necessary). For most edit failures the interviewer has the ability to override the edit failure if they cannot resolve the apparent discrepancy. As well, for most questions the interviewer has the ability to enter a response of Don't Know or Refused if the respondent does not answer the question. Once the data is received back at head office an extensive series of processing steps is undertaken to thoroughly verify each record received. This includes the coding of industry and occupation information and the review of interviewer entered notes. The editing and imputation phases of processing involve the identification of logically inconsistent or missing information items, and the correction of such conditions. Since the true value of each entry on the questionnaire is not known, the identification of errors can be done only through recognition of obvious inconsistencies (for example, a 15 year-old respondent who is recorded as having last worked in 1940).  Estimation  The final step in the processing of LFS data is the assignment of a weight to each individual record. This process involves several steps. Each record has an initial weight that corresponds to the inverse of the probability of selection. Adjustments are made to this weight to account for non-response that cannot be handled through imputation. In the final weighting step all of the record weights are adjusted so that the aggregate totals will match with independently derived population estimates for various age-sex groups by province and major sub-provincial areas. One feature of the LFS weighting process is that all individuals within a dwelling are assigned the same weight. In January 2000, the LFS introduced a new estimation method called Regression Composite Estimation. This new method was used to re-base all historical LFS data. It is described in the research paper ""Improvements to the Labour Force Survey (LFS)"", Catalogue no. 71F0031X. Additional improvements are introduced over time; they are described in different issues of the same publication.  Data accuracy  Since the LFS is a sample survey, all LFS estimates are subject to both sampling error and non-sampling errors. Non-sampling errors can arise at any stage of the collection and processing of the survey data. These include coverage errors, non-response errors, response errors, interviewer errors, coding errors and other types of processing errors. Non-response to the LFS tends to average about 10% of eligible households. Interviews are instructed to make all reasonable attempts to obtain LFS interviews with members of eligible households. Each month, after all attempts to obtain interviews have been made, a small number of non-responding households remain. For households non-responding to the LFS, a weight adjustment is applied to account for non-responding households. Sampling errors associated with survey estimates are measured using coefficients of variation for LFS estimates as a function of the size of the estimate and the geographic area.

Marital Status, Alberta Economic Regions


Year: 2009

Abstract:
This Alberta Official Statistic describes the marital status of Alberta’s census families by economic regions for the 2011 census year. Alberta is divided into eight economic regions as follows: Lethbridge – Medicine -Hat; Camrose-Drumheller; Calgary; Banff – Jasper – Rocky Mountain House; Red Deer; Edmonton; Athabasca – Grande Prairie – Peace River; and Wood Buffalo – Cold Lake. This Alberta Official Statistic describes the marital status of Albertans by these economic regions based on the 2011 population census. The graph describes six marital statuses categorized as ’married (and not separated)’, ‘living common-law’, ‘single (never legally married)’, ‘separated’, ‘divorced’ and ‘widowed’.

Plant use among the Metis near Lac La Biche, Alberta: A study of tradition and change


Author(s): Johnston, B. C.

Year: 1992

Abstract:
This work studied change in the use of wild plants among the Metis near Lac La Biche, Alberta. The data were obtained from thirty-three residents at the Kikino and Buffalo Lake settlements during the summers of 1990 and 1991. The study had three objectives; the determination of the plant species used and their purposes, quantitative change, or retention, in the use of each of several plant categories, and the reasons for the change or retention in each category. Eighty-six plant species were identified for purposes of food, medicine, fabrication, fuel, and miscellaneous intents. These groupings were further divided into fourteen sub-categories. Respondents reported a reduction of use in all fourteen. The most substantial reductions occurred in non-berry foods, fabrication plants, tobaccos, and dyes. Reductions in the categories of berries and cherries, organic medicine, smoking woods, and decorative plants were less substantial than in other groupings. The most frequently cited reasons for change were: the economic integration of residents into the cash economy of the exterior culture, the better quality or convenience of some commercial goods, and the present occupation and consequent location of residents. In the later case, residents reported that they rarely participated in the traditional activities which once brought them into the wilderness, a location which prompted the use of traditional plant products. Modern roads and vehicles have also improved the accessibility of commercial goods. In some instances the same reasons that were given for change also served to continue the use of a few plant categories. The introduction of goods from the exterior culture has in some cases displaced previous plant uses. In others, commercial goods are used in addition to traditional plant applications. The overall reduction in wild plant use will likely continue.

Population Distribution, Alberta Economic Regions


Year: 2009

Abstract:
This Alberta Official Statistic provides the distribution of Alberta’s population within the 8 economic regions of Alberta for 2011. Alberta is divided into eight economic regions as follows: Lethbridge – Medicine -Hat; Camrose-Drumheller; Calgary; Banff – Jasper – Rocky Mountain House; Red Deer; Edmonton; Athabasca – Grande Prairie – Peace River; and Wood Buffalo – Cold Lake. The economic regions of Calgary and Edmonton account for the largest proportion (69.0%) of Alberta’s population. The remaining six economic regions each accounted for less than 10% of the population.

Population Growth, Alberta Economic Regions


Year: 2009

Abstract:
This Alberta Official Statistic describes the growth of Alberta’s population by Economic Regions between the 2006 Census and the 2011 Census. Alberta is divided into eight economic regions as follows: Lethbridge – Medicine Hat; Camrose-Drumheller; Calgary; Banff – Jasper – Rocky Mountain House; Red Deer; Edmonton; Athabasca – Grande Prairie – Peace River; and Wood Buffalo – Cold Lake.

Proportion of Population by Language Spoken Most Often at Home, Alberta Economic Regions


Year: 2009

Abstract:
This Alberta Official Statistic describes the proportion of population based on language spoken most often at home in each economic region as reported in the 2011 population census. Alberta is divided into eight economic regions as follows: Lethbridge – Medicine -Hat; Camrose-Drumheller; Calgary; Banff – Jasper – Rocky Mountain House; Red Deer; Edmonton; Athabasca – Grande Prairie – Peace River; and Wood Buffalo – Cold Lake.

Proportion of Population by Mother Tongue, Alberta Economic Regions


Year: 2009

Abstract:
This Alberta Official Statistic shows the proportion of population by mother tongue in the eight Alberta economic regions for the 2011 Census year. Alberta is divided into eight economic regions as follows: Lethbridge – Medicine -Hat; Camrose-Drumheller; Calgary; Banff – Jasper – Rocky Mountain House; Red Deer; Edmonton; Athabasca – Grande Prairie – Peace River; and Wood Buffalo – Cold Lake. Mother tongue refers to the first language learned at home in childhood and still understood by the person on May 10, 2011. Non-official languages are languages other than English or French. According to the 2011 census, 77.8% of Albertans reported English as their mother tongue, followed by a non-official language (20.1%), and French (2.1%). The Red Deer economic region reported the highest proportion of Albertans with English as a mother tongue (89.7%) and the lowest proportion of Albertans with a non-official language as a mother tongue (8.9%), while Calgary reported the lowest proportion (73.4%) of Albertans with English as mother tongue and the highest proportion of Albertans with a non-official language as a mother tongue (24.9%).

Sulfur compounds in oils from the western Canada tar belt


Year: 1976

Abstract:
Sulfur compounds in the gas oil fractions from two bitumens (Athabasca oil sand and Cold Lake deposit), a heavy oil (Lloydminster) from Cretaceous reservoirs along the western Canada sedimentary basin, and a Cretaceous oil from a deep reservoir that may be mature (Medicine River) are investigated. The gas oil distillates were separated to concentrates of different hydrocarbon types on a liquid adsorption chromatographic column. The aromatic hydrocarbon types with their associated sulfur compounds were resolved by gas chromatographic simulated distillation and then by gas solid chromatography. Some sulfur compounds were further characterized by mass spectrometry. The predominant sulfur compounds in these fractions are alkyl-substituted benzo- and dibenzothiophenes with short side chains which have few dominant isomers.