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Island Lake


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Athabasca County No. 12 AB
Canada

Island Lake


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Location

MB
Canada

Island Lake


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Location

Crowsnest Pass AB
Canada

A study of water and sediment quality as related to public health issues, Fort Chipewyan, Alberta


Author(s): Timoney, K. P.

Year: 2007

Abstract:
"This study examined water and sediment quality indicators in the area of Fort Chipewyan, Alberta. Data were analyzed and discussed in the contexts of water and sediment quality guidelines, wildlife contaminants, and ecosystem and public health.

Breeding distribution and behaviour of the white pelican in the Athabasca oil sands area


Author(s): Beaver, R., & Ballantyne M.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
Aerial surveys and ground investigations were conducted in the spring and summer months from 1975 to 1977 on a breeding population of White Pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) in the Birch Mountains area of northeastern Alberta. In 1975, an undetermined number of White Pelicans bred at Big Island Lake located approximately 20 km northeast of Namur Lake; however, the sighting of only 12 young during a July aerial survey at that location suggested a small breeding flock. Pelicans did not breed successfully at Namur Lake, a previously occupied nesting location, during the course of this study. In 1976 and 1977, White Pelicans established nesting colonies and bred at a rookery site at Birch Lake, located approximately 10 km south of Namur Lake. Aerial photographs taken at the Birch Lake rookery during the height of the nesting season in late May and early June revealed 140 breeding pairs in 1976 and 70 pairs in 1977. Sixty-eight young were raised to the flying stage in 1976, compared with 55 in 1977, resulting in fledging rates of 0.49 and 0.78 young per nesting attempt in those respective years. Calculated breeding success (number of young raised to the flying stage from estimated total eggs laid) was 22.1 percent in 1976 and 35.7 percent in 1977. In 1976, an estimated eight to 20 nests were lost to rising water levels induced by beaver (Castor canadensis) dams constructed on the outflow channel of Birch Lake. Periodic removal of these dams prevented loss of nests in 1977 to flooding. Mortality during the breeding season included an 11.7 percent loss of eggs and a 19.1 percent loss of young in 1977, the only year for which such data were obtained. White Pelicans bred only on island sites located in permanent water bodies. The birds nested on flat or gently sloping terrain which provided loose substrates for nest mound construction. These substrates varied in composition from loose organic soils to gravel with scattered rock. Density and composition of vegetative cover at nesting locations were also variable, being partly modified by the nesting activity of the birds themselves. Pelicans, which were presumably foraging, were observed on water bodies as far as 69 km from the breeding site. Both adults and young demonstrated varying levels of behavioural responses to disturbances occurring near the rookery. The documentation of these responses and other behaviour is presented in a discussion which considers their implications with respect to the potential effects of development of the Athabasca Oil Sands deposits and the anticipated accelerated recreational use of the Birch Mountains wilderness. Management and reclamation strategies are discussed.

Island Lake


Year: 1989

Citation:
[Anonymous] (1989).  Island Lake. 8.

Metals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in colonial waterbird eggs from Lake Athabasca and the Peace-Athabasca Delta Canada


Year: 2011

Abstract:
In 2009, aquatic bird eggs from a variety of species were collected from three sites in northern Alberta, Canada. Two sites were located in receiving waters of the Athabasca River, which drains the oil sands industrial region north of Fort McMurray, Alberta. The third site, located on the Peace River, was remote from the influence of the Athabasca River. Levels of mercury, arsenic, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured in the eggs along with nitrogen stable isotopes (δ¹⁵N) as an indicator of bird trophic position. Levels of As and PAHs in eggs were low, whereas Hg was measureable in all samples. Egg Hg levels increased with δ¹⁵N values (a proxy of food web trophic position); however, some eggs exhibited Hg levels greater than expected based on trophic position. These eggs were from sites in receiving waters of the Athabasca River, namely, Mamawi Lake and Egg Island. Levels of Hg in egg pools were correlated with naphthalene levels, perhaps indicating a common source of contamination. Temporal comparison of Hg levels in California gull (Larus californicus) eggs from the Lake Athabasca colony indicated that egg Hg burdens increased 40% from 1977 to 2009. More research is required to evaluate temporal trends in levels of environmental contaminants and to identify sources.

Movement patterns and orientation mechanisms in garter snakes


Author(s): Lawson, P. M. A.

Year: 1991

Abstract:
The objectives of this study were to determine movement patterns and navigational ability of garter snakes (Thamnophis) living in a mild climate and compare them with a congeneric population known to be migratory. From 1986-1988 I examined movement behaviour of two populations of garter snakes at Spectacle Lake Provincial Park (SLPP) on Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Thamnophis sirtalis, the common garter snake, is the most widely distributed North American snake species and high latitude populations are migratory. Thamnophis ordinoides, the northwestern garter snake, is restricted to the Pacific northwest and migratory behaviour has never been reported. Both species displayed combinations of traits clearly suggesting nonmigratory behaviour. Home ranges overlapped between individuals, averaged less than 0.3 ha measured over a single active season, and were not clearly distinct from denning areas. Although some directionality of movement was evident, it was likely related to foraging strategy. The navigational abilities of a migratory population of T. sirtalis from Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP) in northern Alberta were examined as were those of the nonmigratory populations of snakes from SLPP. Displacement studies were carried out during the active seasons of 1986-1988 to determine the level of orientational abilities present in each population and to examine potential orientation cues. Snakes were displaced from their home range and tested in an arena under a variety of conditions. The results demonstrated that T. sirtalis from both SLPP and WBNP possessed advanced navigational abilities. Advanced skills may be absent in T. ordinoides. Thamnophis sirtalis at both study sites demonstrated time-compensated solar orientation as determined by 6 hr phase-delayed tests. Pheromone trails produced by recently copulated females (but not unmated females) also provided an orientation guide for displaced WBNP males, but results from SLPP were less conclusive. Thamnophis ordinoides did not respond in a discernible way to either cue. Navigational skills thus vary relatively little between migrating and nonmigrating populations of the same species but may be poorly developed in completely nonmigratory species.

Pottery and prehistory of Black Fox Island : Technical patterns in a cultural perspective


Author(s): Connor-Learn, K. M.

Year: 1986

Abstract:
Masters thesis. Analyses of part of a pottery vessel recovered from site GFPa-32 in the southern boreal forest of Alberta suggests that the vessel is closer to late variant Saskatchewan Basin ware than to the Clearwater Lake Punctuate type. Includes a discussion of the relationship between these two cultural groups.

Radionuclide levels in fish from Lake Athabasca, February, 1993


Author(s): Smithson, G.

Year: 1993

Abstract:
The Northern River Basins study was initiated in 1991 to understand and characterize the cumulative effects of development on the water and aquatic environment of the Peace, Slave, and Athabasca Rivers. Extensive uranium mine-mill operations were in place around Lake Athabasca from the 1950s to the 1980s and some mining continues today. Residents of the area are concerned that tailings from these mines may enter Lake Athabasca causing radioisotope contamination of the fish. The study performed radiochemical analysis and biological examinations of northern pike, suckers, and lake whitefish collected in February 1993 from Lake Athabasca near Bustard Island and Hook Point. A complete analysis for all the major, naturally occurring radioisotopes was conducted and the fish were examined for abnormal growth problems or diseases. This report describes the results of the analysis.

Segmentation analysis and bathymetric surveys of the Athabasca River - Segment 1


Year: 2008

Abstract:
This report provides a review available literature and data sources to determine segment boundaries within the Peace-Athabasca Delta (PAD) for the Athabasca River Delta channels. To support the segmentation analysis, and to determine the overwintering habitat potential within the major Delta channels, mapping grade bathymetric data were collected for several critical sites identified by the Instream Flow Needs Technical Task Group including: the Embarras River; Embarras River breakthrough channel to Mamawi Creek ( may also be known as Cree Creek); Mamawi Creek; Jackfish Creek (conveys Athabasca River water into Richardson Lake during flow reversals); Richardson River (conveys Athabasca River water during flow reversals); Fletcher Channel; Goose Island Channel; Big Point Channel; and, the area known as Big Eddy. The report contains a description of the field survey as well as its results.

Spider records from Colin-Cornwall Lakes Wildland Provincial Park


Author(s): Nordstrom, W., & Buckle D.

Year: 2004

Abstract:
Three wildland provincial parks and one ecological reserve have been established in the northeast corner of Alberta. Colin-Cornwall Lakes, Fidler-Greywillow and La Butte Creek Wildland Provincial Parks are located in the Canadian Shield Natural Region. Egg Island Ecological Reserve, within Lake Athabasca, is also located in that Natural Region (Alberta Environmental Protection 1998). Note that Fidler-Greywillow is comprised of a strip of mainland plus some islands in Lake Athabasca. These protected areas contain numerous and important examples of Alberta's biodiversity. Much of it is poorly understood or unknown, particularly the invertebrate fauna. The spider fauna is no exception. The spider specimens that were collected in Colin-Cornwall Lakes Wildland Provincial Park during this survey were the first for this area.