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Joseph Lake


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Location

Athabasca County No. 12 AB
Canada

Joseph Lake


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Location

Leduc County AB
Canada

Land ownership and chieftaincy among the Chipewyan and Caribou Eaters


Author(s): Rev. Penard, J. M.

Year: 1929

Abstract:
This paper provides detailed information about the land-owning customs of the Chipewyan caribou-eaters. Father Penard, who lived many years among the Chipewyan, describes a system of family land ownership, identical in its main outlines with the family hunting territories made familiar by the studies of Speck, Low, Davidson, and others among the Algonkian-speaking peoples. Prior to this study Simpson's account suggested family ownership of land among the Chipewyan. Penard's detailed account concurs with this theory. Moreover, the author suggests that further investigation will show the family hunting territory of the Chipewyan to be more or less prevalent over most of the northern Canadian area. The writer believes that this system is continuously prevalent from western Quebec, to the James Bay region, up the Albany to Lake St. Joseph, and around the Rainy River and Lake of the Woods districts as well.

My tribe, the Crees


Author(s): Dion, J. F., & Dempsey H. A.

Year: 1979

Abstract:
My Tribe The Crees by Joseph F. Dion (1888-1960) begins this history of his people at the time of contact with Europeans. He explains the cultural life of the Cree of the Plains in chapters devoted to social customs, warfare, hunting and religion. His narrative then moves on to the impact of European contact and the devastating effects of disease, loss of the buffalo, treaties, and the reserve system. Joseph Dion is a direct descendent of Big Bear, and he writes with authority based on oral tradition. His family told him stories about the events surrounding the Riel Rebellion including the tragedies at Frog Lake and Frenchman's Butte. His family endured through the difficult years following the rebellion. Joseph Dion was a school teacher and political leader. His efforts helped in the formation of the Metis Association and Indian Association of Alberta. His Christian beliefs are evident but the richness of the oral traditions of his family are recorded in this history of the Canadian west from a First Nation's perspective. His historical narrative spans the years of first contact up to the 1950s. The importance of his family's recollections of the turbulent years of the Riel Rebellion and the numbered treaties makes this an important contribution to Canadian history from a Cree point of view. My Tribe The Crees is an authorized student support resource for Alberta Education 10, 20, and 30 high school courses.

Risking rupture: Integral accidents and in/security in Canada's bitumen sands


Author(s): Greaves, W.

Year: 2013

Abstract:
The expansion of unconventional hydrocarbon development in Western Canada is one of the most contentious issues in contemporary Canadian politics. Although widely studied, little attention has been paid to the framing of Alberta's bitumen sands within distinct and incompatible discourses of energy and environmental security. This essay examines these discourses using the tools of securitization analysis, asking the basic questions of what each presents as needing to be secured, from what, and by what means. Presented with two sets of socially constructed in/ security claims related to the bitumen sands and proposed pipeline expansion, the author suggests the social theory of Paul Virilio provides a useful intervention into securitization analysis that allows the material implications of these discourses to be clarified and assessed. Drawing upon Virilio's critical account of technological progress and his theory of accidents, this essay proposes that conventional accounts of "energy security" in the bitumen sands cannot result in meaningful conditions of security because they remain premised upon continued and expanded hydrocarbon consumption in an era of anthropogenic climate change.