Skip To Content

Hope Lake


View Larger Map

Location

Athabasca County No. 12 AB
Canada

Hope Lake


View Larger Map

Location

AB
Canada

An anthropological survey of communities in the Mackenzie-Slave Lake region of Canada


Author(s): Cohen, R.

Year: 1962

Abstract:
Field work in summer of 1960 at Fort Providence, Fort Simpson, Fort Norman, Fort Good Hope and Fort McPherson. Centres of Yellowknife, Hay River, Aklavik and Inuvik are described briefly.

Assessment of impacts on the Slave River Delta of Peace River impoundment at Hudson Hope


Author(s): English, M. C.

Year: 1996

Abstract:
The objective of this study is to examine the impact of regulating the Peace River in 1968 on the natural progradation of the Slave River Delta into Great Slave Lake. The report describes the hydrological relationship between the Peace and Slave Rivers both before and after impoundment. Changes in the flow regime of the Peace River that have occurred since impoundment and impacts of this change on the sediment transport regime of the Slave River are discussed. Implications of the altered sediment regime on the continued progradation of the Slave River Delta into Great Slave Lake are presented by examining change in the geomorphological and botanical dynamics of the Slave River Delta both before and after impoundment.

Co-management of resources between Whitefish Lake First Nation and the Province of Alberta; social forestry and local-global articulations


Author(s): Ivanitz, M. J.

Year: 1996

Abstract:
Co-management of renewable resources between First Nations and the Province of Alberta is in its infancy. In 1994, a significant step was taken in making co-management a reality. This was accomplished through the signing of the Memorandum of Agreement and Memorandum of Understanding between Whitefish Lake First Nation and the Government of the Province of Alberta, providing for a deciduous timber permit to Whitefish Lake First Nation and an agreement on a process to consult and cooperate on matters of mutual interest in the co-operative management of forests, wildlife, and fisheries. This research is a study of process through applied/development anthropology, social forestry, and change. The specific focus was to develop an "Implementation Plan" to facilitate the implementation of the Memoranda. The development of the Implementation Plan represents a process of dispute resolution--a process which is critical to the success of cross-cultural resource management structures. Unless parties to potential agreement are brought together and accommodations and reconciliations made, there is no possible hope of successful partnerships or resource sharing. In the case of Whitefish Lake First Nation and the Province of Alberta, what is crucial is that in the interest of reaching agreement on a workable and practical resource management Implementation Plan, the stakeholders have come together, putting rhetoric and differences aside and are operating on principles of equality, equity and fairness. The Implementation Plan reflects realistic co-operative management, as through the planning process, scientific, bureaucratic, and traditional ecological epistemologies are reconciled. This thesis also contains the components of a human theory of development. It is applied theoretical development based on reality as opposed to rhetoric, considerations of power and knowledge, the realities of economic participation and environmental conservation, issues of tenure, and the critical importance of culture in the implementation of decision-making dispute resolution, the acceptance of responsibility, and the perceptual basis of power equity.

Documenting Dene traditional environmental knowledge


Author(s): Johnson, M.

Year: 1992

Abstract:
In a participatory action research project, local Dene and non-Native researchers in Fort Good Hope and Colville Lake, Northwest Territories (Canada), are documenting Dene traditional environmental knowledge and resource management systems. Problems in integrating Dene knowledge and Western science stem from incompatible world views.

Hydraulic flood routing models of the Peace and Slave rivers, Hudson Hope to Great Slave Lake


Author(s): Hicks, F. E., & McKay K.

Year: 1996

Abstract:
Describes a hydraulic flood routing model developed to accurately model the open water river discharge on the Peace and Slave rivers. The model is capable of modelling the discharge at sites where no discharge data exist. The document includes description of the development of the database for the model, including the geometric database (channel distances, surface slopes, bed profiles, channel widths and resistances) and the hydrologic data. The appendix includes a user manual for the user-friendly microcomputer program that has been set up to run historical flows (1961-93) and to simulate naturalised flows on the Peace River (1969-91).

Risking rupture: Integral accidents and in/security in Canada's bitumen sands


Author(s): Greaves, W.

Year: 2013

Abstract:
The expansion of unconventional hydrocarbon development in Western Canada is one of the most contentious issues in contemporary Canadian politics. Although widely studied, little attention has been paid to the framing of Alberta's bitumen sands within distinct and incompatible discourses of energy and environmental security. This essay examines these discourses using the tools of securitization analysis, asking the basic questions of what each presents as needing to be secured, from what, and by what means. Presented with two sets of socially constructed in/ security claims related to the bitumen sands and proposed pipeline expansion, the author suggests the social theory of Paul Virilio provides a useful intervention into securitization analysis that allows the material implications of these discourses to be clarified and assessed. Drawing upon Virilio's critical account of technological progress and his theory of accidents, this essay proposes that conventional accounts of "energy security" in the bitumen sands cannot result in meaningful conditions of security because they remain premised upon continued and expanded hydrocarbon consumption in an era of anthropogenic climate change.

The Central Mackenzie; an area economic survey.


Author(s): Villiers, D.

Year: 1968

Abstract:
This survey of five communities in the Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories, includes data on the physical environment, communications and transportation, natural resources, the individual settlements, history, economy and employment. Settlements included are Colville Lake, Fort Good Hope, Fort Norman and Fort Franklin, with site plans of each.

Traditional Dene environmental knowledge: a pilot project conducted in Ft. Good Hope and Colville Lake, N.W.T. 1989 - 1993


Author(s): Johnson, M., & Ruttan R. A.

Year: 1993

Abstract:
Report on a three-year project to gather and document knowledge of the natural environment inherent in the cultures of the Dene peoples of the Mackenzie Valley, Northwest Territories, specifically at Fort Good Hope (Ra deli Ko) in the North Slavey region, and at Colville Lake (K'ah ba mi Tue).

Western Arctic: Canada's Northwest Territories


Year: 1990

Abstract:
Travel guide to the Western Northwest Territories with brief descriptions of the communities of Inuvik, Aklavik, Fort McPherson, Arctic Red River, Tuktoyaktuk, Sachs Harbour, Paulatuk, Norman Wells, Fort Norman, Fort Franklin, Colville Lake, Fort Good Hope. Includes maps and many photographs.